Inorganic Chemical Contaminants --

EPA claims sludge is safe because it only 9 tests for inorganics, Part 503.13, Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper, Lead, Mercury, Molybdenum,
Nickel, Selenium and Zinc called: 1)  toxic pollutants (
CWA) and (Part 401.15),   priority toxic pollutants (Part 131.36);  2) Hazardous
Constituents
(RCRA) and hazardous rule Part 261; 3) hazardous substance (Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation
and Liability Act
(CERCLA -- also called Superfund Act or SARA)) ; 4) Hazardous Inorganic and Organic Constituents (CWA/RCRA solid
waste rule
Part 258);  and 5) toxic chemicals in the EMERGENCY PLANNING AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW ACT (EPCRA);  

By Jim Bynum,VP                                                                                                                                                                                                                     1/1/2009
Help for Sewage Victims

Table 7 -- death and disease
  EPA 1989
cancer list
Cancer
agent
Heart
Disease
Respiratory
Liver
Kidney
Blood
system
cerebro --
vascular
disease
Reproductive
damage
Immune
system
glands
attention
deficits
High blood
pressure
Antimony
  X
                   
Arsenic
X
X
  X
X
X
X
         
Asbestos
  X
  X
               
Beryllium
X
X
  X
               
Cadmium
X
X
    X
X
X
X
       
Chromium
X  
X
      X
X
         
Copper
  X
    X
X
           
Cyanide
              X
  X
   
Lead
  X
      X
  X
X
  X
X
Mercury
  X
  X
  X
  X
    X
X
Manganese
        X
    X
X
     
Molybdenum
  X
                   
Nickel
X
X  
  X
               
Nitrate and
Nitrite
          X
X
         
organotin
  X
    X
X
  X
X
X
   
Selenium
  X  
    X
X
X
X
       
Silver
    X
  X
             
Thallium
    X
X
X
X
X
X
       
Zinc
  X
      X
           
Inorganic contaminates  etc http://www.epa.gov/waterscience/criteria/drinking/#micro

Antimony -- Action level 6 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/antimony.html
Short-term: EPA has found antimony to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Long-term: Antimony has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL:
AND/OR- Antimony is a (known/potential drinking water) human carcinogen. OR- No reliable data are available concerning
health effects from long-term exposure to antimony in drinking water.

Arsenic -- Action level 10 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/arsenic/index.html
Arsenic. Some people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of EPA's standard over many years could experience
skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Non-cancer effects can include thickening and discoloration of the skin, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting; diarrhea; numbness
in hands and feet; partial paralysis; and blindness. Arsenic has been linked to cancer of the bladder, lungs, skin, kidney,
nasal passages, liver, and prostate.

Asbestos -- Action level 7 M.L. (million fibers per liter)
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/asbestos.html
Short-term: Asbestos is not known to cause any health problems when people are exposed to it at levels above the MCL for
relatively short periods of time.

Long-term: Asbestos has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL: lung
disease; cancer.

Barium -- Action level 2 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/barium.html
Short-term: EPA has found barium to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: gastrointestinal disturbances and muscular weakness.

Long-term: Barium has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL: high
blood pressure.

Beryllium -- Action level 4 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/berylliu.html
Short-term: EPA has found barium to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: inflammation of the lungs when inhaled; less toxic in drinking water.

Long-term: Beryllium has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL:
damage to bones and lungs; cancer.

Cadmium -- Action level 5 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/cadmium.html
Short-term: EPA has found cadmium to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle cramps, salivation, sensory
disturbances, liver injury, convulsions, shock and renal failure.

Long-term: Cadmium has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL:
kidney, liver, bone and blood damage.

Chromium -- Action level  0.1 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/chromium.html
Short-term: EPA has found chromium to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: skin irritation or ulceration.

Long-term: Chromium has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL:
damage to liver, kidney circulatory and nerve tissues; skin irritation.


Copper -- Action level: 1.3 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/copper.html
Short- and long-term effects: Copper is an essential nutrient, required by the body in very small amounts. However, EPA has
found copper to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels above the Action Level.
Short periods of exposure can cause gastrointestinal disturbance, including nausea and vomiting. Use of water that exceeds
the Action Level over many years could cause liver or kidney damage. People with Wilsons disease may be more sensitive
than others to the effect of copper contamination and should consult their health care provide

Cyanide -- Action level 0.2 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/cyanide.html
Short-term: EPA has found cyanide to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: rapid breathing, tremors and other neurological effects

Long-term: Cyanide has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL: weight
loss, thyroid effects, nerve damage

Fluoride -- Action level 4 ppm / secondary 2 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/hfacts.html
Many communities add fluoride to their drinking water to promote dental health. Each community makes its own decision
about whether or not to add fluoride. EPA has set an enforceable drinking water standard for fluoride of 4 mg/L (some
people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of this level over many years could get bone disease, including pain and
tenderness of the bones). EPA has also set a secondary fluoride standard of 2 mg/L to protect against dental fluorosis.
Dental fluorosis, in its moderate or severe forms, may result in a brown staining and/or pitting of the permanent teeth. This
problem occurs only in developing teeth, before they erupt from the gums. Children under nine should not drink water that
has more than 2 mg/L of fluoride.

Lead -- Action level 15 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/lead.html
Short- and Long-term effects: Lead can cause a variety of adverse health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time. These effects may include interference with red blood cell chemistry,
delays in normal physical and mental development in babies and young children, slight deficits in the attention span, hearing,
and learning abilities of children, and slight increases in the blood pressure of some adults.

Long-term effects: Lead has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL:
stroke and kidney disease; cancer.

Too much lead in the human body can cause serious damage to the brain, kidneys, nervous system, and red blood cells.
You have the greatest risk, even with short term exposure, if: you are a young child, or you are pregnant.
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/lead1.html


Mercury -- action level 2 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/mercury.html
Short- or Long-term: EPA has found mercury to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it
at levels above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: kidney damage.

Nitrates -- Action level Nitrates 10 ppm / Nitrites 1 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/nitrates.html
Short-term: Excessive levels of nitrate in drinking water have caused serious illness and sometimes death. The serious
illness in infants is due to the conversion of nitrate to nitrite by the body, which can interfere with the oxygen-carrying
capacity of the childs blood. This can be an acute condition in which health deteriorates rapidly over a period of days.
Symptoms include shortness of breath and blueness of the skin.

Long-term: Nitrates and nitrites have the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the
MCL: diuresis, increased starchy deposits and hemorrhaging of the spleen.

Selenium -- Action level 0.05 ppm
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/selenium.html
Short-term: Selenium is an essential nutrient at low levels. However, EPA has found selenium to potentially cause the
following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: hair and
fingernail changes; damage to the peripheral nervous system; fatigue and irritability.

Long-term: Selenium has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL: hair
and fingernail loss; damage to kidney and liver tissue, and the nervous and circulatory systems.

Thallium -- Action level 2 ppb
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/dwh/c-ioc/thallium.html
Short-term: EPA has found thallium to potentially cause the following health effects when people are exposed to it at levels
above the MCL for relatively short periods of time: gastrointestinal irritation; nerve damage.

Long-term: Thallium has the potential to cause the following effects from a lifetime exposure at levels above the MCL:
changes in blood chemistry; damage to liver, kidney, intestinal and testicular tissues; hair loss.