Rothia

Rothia dentocariosa is a commensal organism of the human oropharynx. Clinical infection due to this organism is
rare. A case of recurrent peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by R dentocariosa and a review of the
literature is reported. Isolation of R dentocariosa from dialysate fluid should not be dismissed as a contaminant.
Although there are no interpretive criteria for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, R dentocariosa appears to be
susceptible to a variety of antibiotics including beta-lactams, vancomycin and aminoglycosides. Optimal therapy of
peritoneal dialysis peritonitis caused by this organism may also require removal of the catheter.

Rothia dentocariosa is a commensal organism of the human oropharynx. R dentocariosa has been associated with
dental caries and periodontal disease (1,2); rarely, it causes serious infections, most notably infective endocarditis
(3,4). It has also been reported to cause arteriovenous fistula infection (5), pilonidal abscess (6), pneumonia (7,8)
and endophthalmitis (9).

Can J Infect Dis Med Microbiol. 2004 May–Jun; 15(3): 171–173.
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Rothia dentocariosa is a gram-positive bacterium that can normally be found in the human oral cavity. We report the
first case of endocarditis in which R. dentocariosa was cultured from the affected valves.

This is the first case of endocarditis in which Rothia dentocariosa was cultured from three affected valves. In
addition, the records of two microbiology laboratories in France showed that R. dentocariosa was rarely involved in
severe infection and that positive blood cultures were not associated with endocarditis.

J Clin Microbiol. 1998 January; 36(1): 309–310.