Leminorella

J Clin Microbiol, 1985 Feb, 21(2), 234 - 9
Leminorella, a new genus of Enterobacteriaceae: identification of Leminorella grimontii sp . nov . and
Leminorella richardii sp . nov . found in clinical specimens; Hickman-Brenner FW et al.; Leminorella is
proposed as a new genus for the group of Enterobacteriaceae formerly known as Enteric Group 57 .
Strains of Leminorella gave positive tests for H2S production, acid production from L-arabinose and
D-xylose, and tyrosine clearing; they were negative for indole production, Voges-Proskauer, urea
hydrolysis, phenylalanine deaminase, motility, gelatin liquefaction, lysine and ornithine
decarboxylases, arginine dihydrolase, growth in KCN, and acid production from adonitol, D-arabitol,
cellobiose, erythritol, D-galactose, myo-inositol, lactose, maltose, D-mannitol, D-mannose, melibiose,
alpha-CH3-glucoside, raffinose, L-rhamnose, salicin, D-sorbitol, sucrose, and trehalose . By DNA
hybridization, strains of Leminorella were only 3 to 16% related to other Enterobacteriaceae and were
divided into three groups . Leminorella grimontii is proposed as the type species for the genus and
strain CDC 1944-81, ATCC 33999, is designated as the type strain . There were four strains of L .
grimontii from stool specimens and two from urine specimens . L . richardii is proposed as the name
for the second species (type strain, CDC 0978-82, ATCC 33998) . All four L . richardii strains were
from stool specimens . L . grimontii can be distinguished from L . richardii because it produces gas
from glucose (100%) and acid from dulcitol (83%) and is methyl red positive (100%) . One strain,
CDC 3346-72, was more related to L . grimontii by DNA hybridization than to L . richardii, but the
lower relatedness to both of these species indicated that it may be a third species . Biochemically it
could not be distinguished from L . grimontii . All Leminorella strains were resistant (no zone of
inhibition) to ampicillin, carbenicillin, and cephalothin . Some of the Leminorella strains were sent to
us for Salmonella serotyping, and two reacted weakly in Salmonella antisera . The clinical
significance of Leminorella is unknown.



Leminorella   (1999 )  The site of isolation was urine in 6, wound in 3, and blood, peritoneal
fluid, and sputum in 1 each. Lm was the only isolate from the site of infection in 7 cases.
Based on clinical data Lm was classified as a definite pathogen in 6 cases, probable in 2, and
a possible pathogen in 3; causing UTI in 5 patients, surgical site infection in 2, bronchitis, soft
tissue infection, primary bacteremia and secondary peritonitis in 1 each. Only in one case did
Lm isolate have no clinical significance. All 12 isolates were resistant to second gen.
cephalosporins. 5/12 isolates were susceptible to penicillins, third gen. cephalosporins and
ciprofloxacin. 7/12 of isolates were resistant to penicillins, penicillin/inhibitor combinations, and
to cefotaxime. 11/12 isolates were susceptible to ceftazidim, and all were susceptible to
imipenem and amikacin. We conclude that Leminorella spp. should be considered as a
significant nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a variety of clinical syndromes. Clinical
isolates of Leminorella are often resistant to multiple antibiotic agents.


Leminorella species, a New Nosocomial Pathogen: Clinical Significance and Antibiotic Resistance.

BLEKHER L, SIEGMAN-IGRA Y, SCHWARTZ D, BERGER S, CARMELI Y.

Abstr Intersci Conf Antimicrob Agents Chemother Intersci Conf Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1999
Sep 26-29; 39: 619 (abstract no. 1432).
Tel Aviv Med. Ctr., Tel Aviv, ISRAEL.

Leminorella spp. (Lm), a Gram negative bacillus belonging to the enterobacteriaceae was first
described as enteric group 57 in 1981. Lm was isolated from feces and urine specimens but clinical
correlates were not studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance and
spectrum of Lm infection, as well as the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of this organism. The
microbiology laboratory log was searched for isolation of Lm from clinical specimens, and the medical
records were reviewed retrospectively. Identification of organism was done by an automated system
(Baxter/Microscan). 18 cases were identified during the period 1/97-4/99, and 12 cases were
reviewed. 11/ 12 isolates were nosocomial. There was no clustering of cases in time or space. Mean
age was 57 (range 10-88), 75% were male, 10/12 had underlying conditions that may have
predisposed them to the infection. 7/12 patients had fever, 6 leukocytosis and 1 leukopenia at the
time Lm was isolated. The site of isolation was urine in 6, wound in 3, and blood, peritoneal fluid, and
sputum in 1 each. Lm was the only isolate from the site of infection in 7 cases. Based on clinical data
Lm was classified as a definite pathogen in 6 cases, probable in 2, and a possible pathogen in 3;
causing UTI in 5 patients, surgical site infection in 2, bronchitis, soft tissue infection, primary
bacteremia and secondary peritonitis in 1 each. Only in one case did Lm isolate have no clinical
significance. All 12 isolates were resistant to second gen. cephalosporins. 5/12 isolates were
susceptible to penicillins, third gen. cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin. 7/12 of isolates were resistant
to penicillins, penicillin/inhibitor combinations, and to cefotaxime. 11/12 isolates were susceptible to
ceftazidim, and all were susceptible to imipenem and amikacin. We conclude that Leminorella spp.
should be considered as a significant nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a variety of clinical
syndromes. Clinical isolates of Leminorella are often resistant to multiple antibiotic agents.
http://gateway.nlm.nih.gov/MeetingAbstracts/102246180.html