This is a work in progress
                                  EPIDEMICS?               
                                  
PANDEMICS?
             COINCIDENCE? Parallels Recycled Sewage use!

                                                        HAZARDOUS WASTE
DRINKING WATER, RECLAIMED SEWAGE EFFLUENT WATER AND SLUDGE BIOSOLIDS USE

by Jim Bynum

As Tom Rooney states it in a September 30, 2006 ESSAY: Sewage diseases worse than deadly spinach

Government agencies claim there have been no documented public health damages from exposure to hazardous
waste, drinking water, pathogen contaminated sewage sludge (biosolids) and sewage effluent (reclaimed water)
used on food crops, parks, school grounds and lawns. However, in the last two decades the medical community
has documented the rise of pandemics across the U.S.

Due to funding restrictions, scientists have focused on personal choices and actions to explain the pandemics.
Now it is time to consider environmental factors effecting public health. You have to remember, if a scientist does
not understand the exposure potential,
any study is the result of a simple guess based on ignorance..

The most commonly recognized foodborne infections are those caused by the bacteria Campylobacter,
Salmonella, and E. coli O157:H7, and by a group of viruses called calicivirus, also known as the Norovirus,
Norwalk and Norwalk-like viruses.
http://www.deadlydeceit.com/Food-borne-illness-death.html

The same Air, Water and Food borne pathogenic microorganisms also cause other serious infections in the body.
Some so called sexual transmitted diseases may actually be transmitted through drinking water or contact with
contaminated biosolids and reclaimed water disposed of on food crops, parks, school grounds, and lawns.

"Recent studies
have shown that patients with periodontal disease are one and a half times more likely to develop
COPD than those without periodontal disease. It is believed that the
bacteria that causes periodontal disease can
travel into the lungs, causing inflammation and infection"

Accurate and current data is hard to come by, but there is enough data to notice a definite trend that
these are no longer Orphan Diseases (a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S.)


      Draft           
 PANDEMIC TABLE FOR U.S.















































































































July 2009 (EPA)
Food allergy, defined as an adverse immunological response to food, affects more than 11 million
Americans and has doubled in incidence between 1997 and 2002. Severe anaphylaxis triggered by
reactions to foods is responsible for 150 deaths and more than 30,000 emergency room visits in the
United States per year.
Despite this impact on health care expenditures, relatively little is known about the risk
factors, disease pathogenesis, or the cellular and molecular processes involved in generating food allergy. Unlike
other allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema or rhinitis, food allergy has no current treatments or therapies
and patients are left with the only options being strict food avoidance and injectable epinephrine for treatment of
responses during accidental exposure. The incidence of food allergy is increasing at an alarming rate, and so
research into pathogenesis and treatment is absolutely paramount. The literature supports a central role of the
Th2-induced allergen-specific IgE in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. However, mounting evidence
supports the lack of correlation between specific IgE levels and incidence, severity or threshold of
responsiveness in food allergy. These findings led us to question the role of allergen-specific IgG in the
regulation of Th2 differentiation and the pathogenesis of allergic disorders.
http://cfpub.epa.gov/ncer_abstracts/index.cfm/fuseaction/display.abstractDetail/abstract/8980/report/0

In 1981 EPA came up with the policy of Utilization of Municipal Wastewater and Sludge for Land
Reclamation and Biomass Production.  However, EPA, FDA, and USDA issued a beneficial sewage sludge
statement SW905, which promoted sludge use on food crops. In 1984 - EPA issued beneficial sewage
sludge use policy WH-595. In 1989 EPA started promoting the proposed part 503 for sludge use. In 1991,
EPA created the Interagency Policy on Beneficial Use of Municipal Sewage Sludge on Federal Lands,  In
1993, EPA issued the part 503 beneficial sludge use regulation. In 1994, it created a public relations
campaign run by the Water Environment Federation to gain public acceptance of sludge use as a
fertilizer on food crops school yards and home lawns and changed the name to biosolids.

In spite of its 1981 statement promoting sludge as a beneficial fertilizer, it was apparent that farmers and
home owner's were reluctant to used hazardous waste contaminated products as long as it was labeled
as such. EPA began the process to change the nature of waste disposal and put our farms and food
supply and health at risk,with one paragraph:

EPA said, "We add this paragraph to respond to public comments that merely to designate a recycling
activity as "hazardous waste management" is immediately to stigmatize it. The Agency is somewhat
skeptical that a redesignation will significantly affect the volume of recycling or that public response to
hazardous waste recycling necessarily is negative. However, to avoid conceivable stigmatization, we are
willing to re-name recycled hazardous waste "regulated recyclable materials." (FR. 48, #65, p. 14493,
April 4, 1983) Some EPA scientist had reservations about putting any organic hazardous waste on the
land as well as metals, even though it was allowed in limited and very controlled conditions. It was the,
"---Agency's philosophy that applying hazardous waste to the soil is a waste management practice
reserved for those (organic) waste streams that can be treated in a soil system." EPA realized that:
"Unless the practice is carefully defined and regulated, irresponsible parties may try to characterize
indiscriminate dumping of waste as land treatment."
Food poisoning
1986
2 million
1994
33 million
1997
81 million
1999
76 million
 
COPD
Cigarette smoking is down,
COPD cases are increasing
    2002
119,000 deaths
726,000 hospitalized
1.5 million Emer. treat
+ 8 million Drs. treat
  2007
24 million cases
Asthma
Asthma affects over 20 million
people, including adults, with
cases jumping 75% from 1980
to 1994. It's time to find out the
real facts and learn valuable
management skills.
  1980
3.6% children
0-17 years
  1995
7.5% children
0-17 years
2004-2005
Children 0-17 yr
Black – 12.7%
White – 8.0%
Puerto Rican –
19.2%
6.5 million children
15.7 million  adults
 
Flu-like deaths
70-80s
5,600 year
  92-97
27,000 year
97-98 season
51,296
 
Necrotizing fastitis
"flesh eating"  
Strep and Staph
MRSA
1985 - 1990
128 cases in 10
hospitals  in  
Tucson. AZ area
  Oct-Dec 1997
1,562 cases in
36 hospitals in US &
Canadian Hosp.
97 cases in AZ
2003
300 cases in 1
Tucson hospital
2005
1,024 in 2 Tucson
hospitals out of 10
Washinton MRSA
1997
141 cases
1999
525 cases
2001
1,223 cases
2003
2,226 cases
2007
4,643 cases
Acid Reflux.
    1989 -1999
29,000 to 34,000
operations
   
Gastroenteritis
    1998
360 million cases of
diarrhea
2005
592,000 infants
and young
children <5 years
old   die each year
from rotavirus
diarrhea,
3 to 6 million
children die each
year.
organ transplants
  1992 waiting  
list 20,000
  2002 waiting list
79,523
2007 waiting list
100,000
Staph MRSA
infections- Hosp. discharges
1993
1,900
1995
38,100
  2000
128,500
2005
368,800
esophageal cancer
1981
approx 1,750
Cases
  2001
7,000 cases
  July 2007
350 percent
increase
in past 10 - 15
years
Papillomasvirus
reproductive organ cancer
Male & female
          25 million young
girls and women
infected
Papillomasvirus
Oral cancer
Mouth & throat
  1995
less than
<6,000 case
annually
  2005
more than >8,000
case annually
 
Pathogenic heart
disease
      2004
24.7 million
diagnosed
654,092 deaths
 
Pathogenic
Pneumonia
    1999
3 million infections
60,000 deaths
   
Kidney disease
1988-1994
14.5% U.S.
Population
  1999-2004
16.8%  U.S
Population
15.9% increase
2000
47,000 waiting
kidney transplant
350,000 endstage
 renal disease
67,000 die each
year
Brain eating Amoeba
Naegleria-fowleri
1965
4 deaths
Australia
  1995 to 2004.
23 deaths U.S.
  2007 (9 months)
6 deaths U.S.
Thyroiditis
        2007
14 million
Bacterial colitis


colectomy rate

Deaths
1993
261 per 100,000
discharged
persons

1.2 per 100,00


20.3 per 100,000
    2003
546 per 100,000
discharged
persons


3.4 per 100,00


50.2 per 100,000
 
Premature Births
          2006
12.8 percent of
births in 2006
540,000 babies
             
0157:H7
E. coli infections
Humans
1975
First documented
human infection
1997
20,000
1999
73,000
3% of food borne
deaths
2003
75,000
2005
79,420
0157:H7
E. coli deaths
1982-1992
15 deaths
1997
200-250 deaths
1999
61     (???)
   
E. coli -ESBL
Kills 10-14%
      Britain 2003
First appeared
affecting elderly
women
Britain 2007
Infects 30,000
people a year.
younger patients
0157:H7
E. coli infected
cattle
1982

USDA survey  "0"
  2002
28% animals at
slaughter
   
Salmonella
1979-1989
CDC noted trend in
increased antibiotic
resistants -
Reported
1984 in humans
1988 in cattle
1990--1995.
CDC noted trend in
infected fruits and
vegetables
2002
31% of foodborne
deaths
   
Salmonella
deaths
case-fatality rate of
3%.
       
Clostridium
C. difficile
1999
5.7 deaths per million
2000
134,000 Infections
hospital stays
2004
23.7 deaths per million
2005
291 infections
hospital stays
2008
500,000 infections
hospital stays
Norovirus
        2007
Human Norovius
found in cattle and
meat
Listeria
1987
1,600 cases with
415 deaths per year
in the US.
      2007
2,500 cases with
500 deaths per year
in U.S.
Treponema,
also found in dental
bofilm
Syphilis
    2000
2.1 per 100,000
2006
9,756 cases
2007
7 yr / 76% increase
11,181 cases
Treponema
Syphilis -
black men
        21.5 cases per
100,000,
99% increase /
since 2003
Autism in California
1983-85
7.5 per 10,000
2,778  cases
1993-95
20.2 per 10,000
Dec 1998,
10,360 cases
Dec 2002
20,377 cases
June 2007
34,656 cases
ADHD
neurobiological
disorder

4-5 in 10,000
2000
CDC -6.6 per 1,000
2002
3-7% children
4% adults
CDC-6.7 per 1000
2003
2.5 mil- ages 4-17  
on medication
--------------------------
Estimated 32%
receive consistent
treatment in 2007
2007
CDC avg. 1 in 150  
of eight year olds
----------------------------
8.7% of 8-15 years
old, yet, only 47.9%
diagnosed  
Bipolar disorder
children
0-19 years
  1994-1995
25 per 100,000
population
  2002-2003
1003 per 100,000
population
 
Bipolar disorder
Adults
20 + years
  1994-1995
905 per 100,000
population
  2002-2003
1,679 per 100,000
population
 
Suicides
45-to-54-year-olds
increased nearly 20
percent from 1999
to 2004,
    For women 45 to
54, the rate leapt 31
percent.